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Swedish Egg Gravy

Swedish Egg Gravy

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Swedish egg gravy is the impeccable counterpart to Swedish Rye Bread, a marriage that begets the perfect simple breakfast.

Over the years, the sole purpose of this gravy has been to be served over Swedish rye bread for breakfast. I like mine with bacon and an egg on top, but my mom prefers hers with just the gravy and bread. When I asked her what else she ate it with, the answer was: nothing. I found this idea humorous but I did realize at that moment that indeed I had never eaten this gravy with anything else.

So I went a little rogue with it. I can confirm that this gravy is delicious with Swedish Meatballs as a change-up from the gravy recipe provided there. It’s great on egg noodles (perhaps with those Swedish meatballs!) as well. It’s also delicious on many kinds of potatoes – it’s just mediocre on Russet potatoes; there’s not enough flavor. But I do recommend it with well-spiced sweet potatoes, purple potatoes or Yukon golds.

Because of the simplicity of the ingredients in Swedish egg gravy, I encourage you to use the best quality ingredients you can. If you’re the sort of person (like I am) who saves leftover bacon grease, you can use that instead of cooking the bacon fresh. BUT! I’ve made it both ways and can confirm that it is more delicious when made with bacon. I also encourage you to use whole milk (preferably grass-fed!), although 2% will do in a pinch.

This recipe makes 5 cups of gravy, but is fairly simple to scale up or down. As a general rule of thumb, aim for about 1.5 eggs and 1.5 – 2 cups (12 – 16 fl oz) milk per person and scale from there. As written, this recipe serves 8 – 10 with 6 eggs and 5 total cups (40 fl oz) milk.

The origins of this recipe are a little murky, and I’m hoping that some day somebody will stumble on this blog and be able to shed a little light on the topic. It definitely came from my mom’s family, and thus probably the Småland province in the south. However, we asked a Swedish friend from Hallands Län on the west coast, and he said he was unfamiliar with the tradition of rye bread and egg gravy. There are a few results around the internet related to Swedish egg gravy – the translation appears to be “aggamat” although many of the recipes I have found are quite different. Most of those appear to be made with ground beef. I’m hoping that some day someone will be able to tell me a little more about the origin story of this recipe.

Swedish-egg-gray-in-cast-iron-with-Swedish-rye-bread-and-wooden-spoon

Looking for other Swedish Recipes? Try my Swedish Corn Pudding, Swedish Pancakes and Smörbakelser recipes!

Swedish Egg Gravy

Swedish egg gravy is the impeccable counterpart to Swedish Rye Bread, a marriage that begets the perfect simple breakfast.

Course Bread, Breakfast, Brunch, Sauces
Cuisine Swedish
Cook Time 25 minutes
Servings 8 - 10 people (5 cups)

Ingredients

  • 4 thick-cut slices bacon substitute 3 tbsp (40 g) bacon grease
  • 5 cups (40 fl oz) whole milk (2 cups + 1 cup + 2 cups)
  • 1/2 cup (60 g) all-purpose flour
  • 6 eggs
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. In a medium frying pan, cook bacon until desired level of doneness. Remove from pan, reserving grease. If just using bacon grease, go ahead and melt it in the pan over medium heat.

  2. In the meantime, whisk together 2 cups (16 fl oz) milk and eggs in a medium bowl.

  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together 1 cup (8 fl oz) milk with all-purpose flour.

  4. Add the last 2 cups (16 fl oz) milk to reserved bacon grease in frying pan. Heat until just warmed - barely simmering.

  5. Add milk and egg mixture and again heat until just warmed / barely simmering, stirring often.

  6. Add milk and flour mixture and heat until thickened, stirring constantly to prevent lumps. Serve over Swedish rye bread.

Currently Listening: Weval – Half Age EP

6 comments on “Swedish Egg Gravy

  1. We call that egg-a-roo-a (not sure of correct spelling.) My husband’s family are from Sweden and my MIL passed this recipe down, along with Swedish Spritzs and oosta kaka.

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      • We called it eggovara and served it over fried potatoes. Amazing that my grandmother lived to be 102 my grandfather to 86 (after he fell off a roof when he was 85).

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